Everything listed under: bed sores

  • Nursing Home Patient's Stage IV 17cm Pressure Ulcer Leads To Generous Settlement For Patient's Family

    A 76 year old male patient admitted to a Central Virginia nursing home, was at a high risk for developing pressure ulcers due to prior falls, fall-related injuries, surgery, and other medical conditions and limitations. On admission the patient did not have any pressure ulcers. Within weeks at the nursing home, the patient developed a stage IV pressure ulcer (pressure sores, bed sore, decubitus ulcer). The sacral pressure ulcer measured 8 cm x 6 cm. Thereafter, the sacral pressure ulcer deteriorated and developed eschar with foul smelling, purulent drainage. The patient’s physician issued a warning for “impending sepsis” as a result of the pressure ulcer.

    The patient was also at the nursing home permitted to develop a stage III pressure ulcer on his right heel which, after debridement, revealed full thickness necrosis down to subcutaneous fat. By that time, the sacral pressure ulcer had also deteriorated to dimensions of 17 cm x 10 cm with a depth of 3.6 cm and demonstrated considerable undermining, extensive necrosis, foul odor, and purulent drainage. When the sacral pressure ulcer was documented to have dimensions of 13.7 cm x 9.2 cm, the patient was discharged from the nursing home and died just one month later.

    The family contacted us to pursue claims against the nursing home for failing to provide proper pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. We were able to obtain a generous settlement for the patient’s family, which is confidential at the nursing home’s request.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


  • Nursing Home Allows Patient to Fall During Care & Sustain Fractures; Nursing Home Settles

    An elderly, immobile nursing home patient was allowed to fall from her bed to the floor while being repositioned during incontinence care. The nursing home aide responsible for the fall turned the patient away from her to the opposite side of the bed, left the patient on her left side, and required the patient, who had sustained a stroke with right-sided compromise, to use her right hand to hold onto the repositioning bar/rail of the bed for safety. The aide then turned away from the patient, and the patient fell from her bed to the floor.

    After the fall, the patient complained of pain to her right arm and right leg. When ambulance attendants arrived at the nursing home after the fall, the patient told the ambulance staff that she did not want to return to the nursing home because the facility did not take care of her. The patient was transferred to a local hospital, where she was diagnosed with a right shoulder fracture and a right femur fracture. The patient was not a surgical candidate, so the fracture was treated conservatively. The patient’s right arm was placed in a sling and her right leg was placed in a leg immobilizer.

    The immobilizer, which was required to stabilize the fracture, caused pressure around the lower leg and caused Right Arm and Leg Fracturesa Stage IV pressure ulcer to develop several weeks after the fall and fractures. The pressure ulcer (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) was documented to be unstageable with purulent green foul smelling drainage. Within a couple of weeks thereafter, the pressure ulcer (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) was noted to involve exposed tendon and bone in the right leg. The pressure ulcer (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) required sharp debridement and was the source of significant pain. The patient later developed sepsis and bacteremia from infection of the right lower leg pressure ulcer (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer). The patient died a little over three months after the fall. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to provide proper fall prevention. The nursing home settled for a confidential amount of money in the mid-six figures.

  • Patient Develops Severe Pressure Ulcers; Hospital and Nursing Home Settle

    An elderly female patient was admitted to a hospital for surgery following a hip fracture at home. On admission, the patient’s skin was intact and she had no pressure ulcers (also called pressure sores, bed sores, or decubitus ulcers). The patient was discharged from the hospital approximately one week later. At the time of discharge, the patient was documented to have three small open areas on her right buttock near the lower back. The patient was discharged from the hospital to a nursing home, which documented the patient to have open “excoriation” on her lower back. The nursing home otherwise assessed the patient as a “low risk for pressure ulcer development.”

    Hip Pressure UlcerTwo days after the patient was admitted to the nursing home, the facility noted the presence of a stage II sacral wound with dimensions of 6 cm x 6 cm with red tissue and drainage. The sacral pressure ulcer deteriorated thereafter. Within a couple of weeks, the ulcer was documented as stage IV with dimensions of 10 cm x 10 cm with significant undermining. While at the nursing home, the patient’s wound continued to deteriorate and became purulent with foul-spelling drainage and tunneling. The pressure ulcer was the source of significant pain and prevented the patient from participating in therapy following the hip fracture for which she was originally hospitalized.

    The patient was later transferred from the nursing home back to the hospital because the pressure ulcer had become infected. The patient had also developed a new pressure ulcer on her left hip. At the hospital, infection of the pressure ulcer was noted to have extended into the left hip hardware. The patient required multiple surgical debridements for the sacral and left hip pressure ulcers. She also experienced what was described in her medical records as “unbearable” pain in her buttock as a result of the sacral ulcer. The patient also required a wound vac and antibiotics. The patient was discharged from the hospital to a new nursing home, where her antibiotic therapy and wound care continued, she received therapy services, and where she remains today.

    We claimed that the hospital and nursing home failed to provide proper pressure ulcer prevention and care. Specifically, the hospital and nursing home failed to turn and reposition the patient as often as was necessary, often left the patient positioned on existing pressure ulcers, and failed to apply and use properly the wound vac, all of which caused the pressure ulcers to develop and deteriorate.

    The hospital and nursing home settled well before trial for a combined settlement in the mid-to-high six figures.



    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia. Sacral Pressure Ulcer Left Hip Pressure Ulcer Sacral Pressure Ulcer Left Hip Pressure Ulcer Hip Pressure Ulcer

 

PLEASE NOTE: THE RESULTS OBTAINED IN SPECIFIC CASES DEPEND ON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.  PAST CASE RESULTS DO NOT GUARANTEE OR PREDICT A SIMILAR RESULT IN FUTURE CASES.  THE RESULTS DESCRIBED IN THIS WEBSITE ARE FROM VIRGINIA CASES HANDLED DIRECTLY BY OUR OFFICE.