Everything listed under: nursing home neglect

  • Nursing Home Patient's Stage IV 17cm Pressure Ulcer Leads To Generous Settlement For Patient's Family

    A 76 year old male patient admitted to a Central Virginia nursing home, was at a high risk for developing pressure ulcers due to prior falls, fall-related injuries, surgery, and other medical conditions and limitations. On admission the patient did not have any pressure ulcers. Within weeks at the nursing home, the patient developed a stage IV pressure ulcer (pressure sores, bed sore, decubitus ulcer). The sacral pressure ulcer measured 8 cm x 6 cm. Thereafter, the sacral pressure ulcer deteriorated and developed eschar with foul smelling, purulent drainage. The patient’s physician issued a warning for “impending sepsis” as a result of the pressure ulcer.

    The patient was also at the nursing home permitted to develop a stage III pressure ulcer on his right heel which, after debridement, revealed full thickness necrosis down to subcutaneous fat. By that time, the sacral pressure ulcer had also deteriorated to dimensions of 17 cm x 10 cm with a depth of 3.6 cm and demonstrated considerable undermining, extensive necrosis, foul odor, and purulent drainage. When the sacral pressure ulcer was documented to have dimensions of 13.7 cm x 9.2 cm, the patient was discharged from the nursing home and died just one month later.

    The family contacted us to pursue claims against the nursing home for failing to provide proper pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. We were able to obtain a generous settlement for the patient’s family, which is confidential at the nursing home’s request.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


  • Patient Falls, Dies From Injuries, Nursing Home Settles At Six-Figures

    A 69-year-old female patient was admitted to a hospital on a stretcher. The patient fell from the stretcher to the ground. While the patient was on the stretcher, medical transport staff permitted the stretcher to roll downhill, hit a sidewalk, and overturn. As a result of the fall, the patient sustained a right clavicle fracture.

    Weeks later, the patient sustained another fall, this time at the nursing home to which she was admitted after her hospitalization. As a result of the fall, the patient sustained a mandible fracture. The patient had to be transferred to another hospital for consultation concerning the mandible fracture. 

    The consulting hospital recommended non-operative treatment, and the patient was returned to the nursing home, where, on return, the fall team recommended and put into place a low bed with fall mats and a concave mattress.

    Shortly thereafter, the patient fell while being transferred by nursing home staff, which was not using a hoyer (mechanical) lift as they were required to do. As a result of the fall, the patient sustained a fracture of her left femur with 80 degrees angulation. The left leg fracture was caused by the fall. The patient died just three weeks later. The death certificate identified the fall and leg fracture as the patient’s immediate cause of death.

    The patient’s family hired us to pursue claims against the medical transport and nursing home for failing to provide the patient with proper fall prevention. We were able to obtain a generous six-figure settlement for the family, the amount of which is confidential at the nursing home’s request.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


  • Patient Hit By Tractor Trailor, SUV, Van, & Pickup Dies; Nursing Home Settles

    A 62-year-old patient was transferred from a hospital to a nursing home with diagnoses of altered mental status, dementia, inability to make his own medical decisions and propensity to wander. The nursing home knew the patient needed 24-hour supervision and could not leave the facility without supervision and assistance.

    Unbeknownst to the patient’s family, the nursing home allowed him to wander from the facility three times in one day. The nursing home located the patient without contacting the police or filing a missing person’s report after the patient’s first departure. After the second time the patient wandered from the facility, police were contacted, a “missing person’s” report was filed and police were able to locate and return the patient. The nursing home did not contact the police or the patient’s family after the third time the patient wandered from the facility. Two days later, the patient wandered onto an interstate highway, was hit by a tractor-trailer, an SUV, a van, a pickup truck, and died at the scene.

    The patient’s family hired us to pursue claims against the nursing home for permitting the patient to wander and elope from the facility. We were able to obtain a very generous settlement for the patient’s family, which the nursing home only paid on the condition that the settlement amount remain confidential.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


  • Nursing Home Settles Due To Patient's Pressure Ulcer Deterioration

    A 79 year old male patient was admitted to a nursing home. At the time of his admission, he was totally dependent on the nursing home’s staff for all activities of daily living. The patient did not have any pressure ulcers when he was admitted. 

    pressure ulcer

    Nursing home staff permitted the patient to develop a pressure ulcer on his sacrum and permitted the pressure ulcer to deteriorate. Nursing home staff was ordered to provide the patient with a pressure-relieving mattress. The nursing home failed to provide the patient with the pressure-relieving mattress for over one month.

    The nursing home also did not obtain wound vac therapy for the patient until yet another month had passed. Even then, the patient’s wound vac therapy stopped prematurely because the nursing home lacked proper supplies. In the interim, the nursing home permitted the patient to develop a pressure ulcer on his left inner heel.

    The patient’s sacral pressure ulcer deteriorated further and was documented to have dimensions of 7.2 cm x 4. 9 cm x 2 cm, undermining of 3.4 cm, and infection. The patient’s family requested the nursing home to have the patient evaluated at the wound clinic. The nursing home staff agreed, but did not thereafter have him evaluated at a wound clinic.

    The patient’s family removed him from the nursing home and brought him home, where he continued to receive care until his death. The patient’s family hired us to pursue claims against the nursing home for failing to prevent and treat the pressure ulcers and infection. We were able to obtain a substantial settlement for the family, which the nursing home demanded be kept confidential.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


  • Nursing Home Settles Case After Allowing 84 Year Old Patient To Fall Several Times

    An 84 year old nursing home patient was allowed by the nursing home to fall several times. As a result of the first of her falls at the nursing home, she sustained a left hip fracture. The hip fracture required surgery. Thereafter, she was placed on transfer and mobility restrictions and experienced significant pain. 

    She later required surgery to remove retained hardware from the site of the surgery due to continuing pain and was placed on weight bearing restrictions. 

    As a result of the second fall, she was diagnosed with a condylar fracture of the left femur. As a result of the third fall at the nursing home, in which she fell from a shower chair, she sustained a laceration to her head that required stitches. The patient was again permitted to fall from a shower chair in her fourth fall at the nursing home.

    The patient’s family hired us to pursue claims against the nursing home for the patient’s falls and fall-related fractures, surgery, and other injuries. We were able to obtain at mediation a generous six-figure settlement for the patient.

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.



  • Fall Causes Fracture, Surgery, Infection, and Immobility; Nursing Home Settles

    An elderly female patient who was a known fall risk was admitted to Avante at Lynchburg, a nursing home in Lynchburg, Virginia.  Just days into her stay, the nursing home permitted her to fall from her wheelchair while being assisted by a CNA.  After the fall, the patient was taken to a local hospital, where she was diagnosed with an oblique left femoral fracture with significant displacement.   

    The fracture required open reduction and  intramedullary fixation surgery.  She remained at the hospital for  10 days.  She returned to the hospital shortly thereafter when  the wound at the surgical incision site appeared to be infected. 

    The resident was treated at the hospital and was  returned  to a rehabilitation center.  The patient suffered significant pain  and immobility as a result of the fracture. The case was tried to a Lynchburg jury, which awarded a substantial six-figure verdict plus interest.  

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    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.




  • Patient’s C.Diff Not Timely Diagnosed or Treated; Nursing Home Settles

    A female patient was admitted to the nursing home for short term rehabilitation. While at the nursing home, the patient began experiencing loose stools and diarrhea daily. She also experienced confusion, drowsiness, nausea, light headedness, low blood pressure, weakness, fever, lethargy, and incontinence. Despite daily diarrhea and decline in her medical condition, the nursing home did not test the patient for Clostridium difficile (C.diff) toxins in her bowel. After two weeks of daily diarrhea, the nursing home finally obtained a stool specimen from the patient and transmitted it for C.diff testing. Delays occurred in obtaining and transmitting the stool specimen for testing, during which time the patient’s condition continued to deteriorate. The patient began experiencing large malodorous green mucous stools. C.diff test results revealed the presence of C.diff toxins in the patient’s stool. The patient was prescribed Flagyl to treat the C.diff. The antibiotic was prescribed far too late in the course of the patient’s C.diff illness and the patient was transferred to the hospital in septic shock.

    At the hospital, the patient was diagnosed with severe C.diff colitis and required removal of her colon. Despite colon removal and placement of a colostomy, the patient continued to deteriorate and was diagnosed with multi-system organ failure and peritonitis. The patient died after being hospitalized for several weeks. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to recognize the patient’s C.diff, timely confirm the C.diff with diagnostic testing, and timely treat the C.diff with antibiotics, all of which would have prevented her lengthy disease, hospitalization, septic shock, and death. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount in the seven figures.

  • Nursing Home Patient Dies After Permitted to Fall From Shower Chair; Nursing Home Settles

    Pain MedicationAn elderly female nursing home resident who required assistance bathing was permitted to fall forward from a shower chair to the floor while being showered at the facility. The aide providing shower care to the resident failed properly to supervise and assist the resident at the time of the fall.

    Right Femur FractureAs a result of the fall, the patient sustained a right hip fracture which required open reduction and internal fixation surgery.  The patient required narcotic pain medication after the fall. Following surgery, the surgical site became infected and required an additional surgery to remove the infection. The surgical wound was then treated with a wound vacuum.

     

    TimelineIn addition, the patient had to undergo multiple surgeries following the incident due to bowel complications that arose after the fall. As with the hip surgery, the wound created by the bowel surgery deteriorated and required a wound vac. Less than two months after the fall, the patient was diagnosed with MRSA infection of the surgical wounds at the right hip and abdomen. The patient died 49 days after the fall from sepsis and respiratory compromise. The patient’s descent from the fall until death is reflected on a timeline that summarizes her injuries and treatment.

    The case against the nursing home was settled, but the settlement amount is confidential at the nursing home’s request.

     


    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia. 
    Pain Medication Right Femur Fracture Timeline
  • Nursing Home Settles Case After Allowing Patient to Fall and Sustain Hip Fracture

    An elderly nursing home patient diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and dementia was admitted to a nursing home for rehabilitation following a hip fracture in May 2008. On admission to the facility, the patient was noted to be a high fall risk. While at the facility, the patient was permitted to fall more than 10 times. In February of 2010, the patient, who required extensive assistance for all ADL’s, fell while unattended in the restroom. The facility’s records indicate that the fall occurred before 9:00 a.m., however, the patient was not sent to the hospital until 12:45 that afternoon.

    Right Femur Fracture with Fixation SurgeryAs a result of the fall, the patient sustained a right hip fracture which required internal fixation surgery. After the fall, the patient required powerful narcotics for pain management. The patient then returned back to the facility where the fall occurred. The patient's surgical wound later became infected and required antibiotic treatment. One month after the fall, the patient’s orthopedist noted that the fracture had little new bone formation. Three months after the fall, the patient developed a urinary Pain Medication Exhibittract infection and required hospitalization because the treatment at the nursing home had been ineffective. Following treatment for the infection, the patient was placed on hospice care. The patient passed away shortly thereafter.

    The nursing home settled the case for a confidential, generous six-figure amount.

     

     


    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.


    Pain Medication Exhibit
  • Nursing Home Patient Breaks Neck and Dies Following Fall from Lift; Nursing Home Settles

    A stroke-compromised, immobile nursing home patient was being transferred using a mechanical lift when staff permitted the patient to fall to the floor. Only one aide was present during the attempted transfer despite the fact that two staff members were required to be present at all times during mechanical lift transfers. In addition, discovery revealed that the nursing home was aware, years before the fall, that the lift was defective.

    Cervical Spine FractureThe nursing home did not obtain a CT scan of the patient’s neck until almost three weeks after the fall, during which time the patient’s head was observed to be positioned “downward and resting on her chest,” the patient became increasingly lethargic and her appetite decreased. The patient could not follow commands and her grip also became weak. The CT scan revealed a neck fracture at C2 with extensive swelling within the spinal canal from C1-C4 with spinal cord compression.

    Once the neck fracture and spinal cord compression were diagnosed, the patient was hospitalized. However, because the neck fracture and spinal cord injury had not been timely identified, the patient’s physicians concluded surgery would be of no benefit. The patient began receiving hospice and palliative care, became less responsive, refused medication, and ultimately refused meals. The patient died three and one-half months after the fall. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for its failure to take proper fall prevention measures. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount.

  • Nursing Home Patient Falls During Transfer; Nursing Home Settles

    An 83-year-old nursing home patient was permitted to fall during a transfer from chair to bed. On admission toLeft Knee Injuries the nursing home, the patient was noted to have dementia, required total assistance for all ADLs, and required a mechanical Hoyer lift for transfers. Prior to the fall, the patient was known to be unable to attempt balance tests without physical help. The patient also had a limited range of motion in all extremities, her cognitive skills were compromised, she required cues and supervision for decision-making, and she was unable to feed herself.

    As a result of the fall, the patient sustained multiple fractures of the left leg and ligament tears of the left knee. After the fall, the patient was noted to scream in pain when her left leg was touched and when she was repositioned. The patient required powerful narcotics after the fall for pain management. The patient was a poor surgical candidate, so she received a knee immobilizer to stabilize the left leg fractures and other injuries. The patient’s orthopedist noted that the fractures had healed within two and one-half months after the fall, but the patient continued to experience decreased mobility. The patient died for reasons unrelated to the fall approximately one year later.

    We were able to obtain a generous six-figure settlement for the patient’s family shortly after a lawsuit was filed and before any significant time or expense was incurred during the case. The exact settlement amount is confidential at the nursing home’s request.


    Left Knee Inuries
  • Nursing Home Patient Allowed to Fall When Exiting Shower; Nursing Home Settles

    Right Wrist FractureAn elderly female nursing home patient who was ambulatory, but required assistance with bathing and toileting, was allowed by the supervising nursing home aide to fall when exiting the shower. The aide did not provide the patient with proper supervision or safety measures for exiting the shower. As a result of the fall, the patient sustained a comminuted fracture of the right wrist and an intertrochanteric fracture of the right hip. The right hip fracture required open reduction and internal fixation surgery. Four days later, the patient required open Right Hip Fracturereduction and internal fixation surgery for the right wrist. The patient recovered without complications and returned to her pre-fall status within several months after the fall.

    The nursing home settled the case for a six figure amount. The exact amount of the settlement is confidential at the nursing home’s request.


    Right Wrist Fracture wtih Surgical Fixation Rigth Hip Fracture with Surgical Fixation
  • Nursing Home Settles Case Involving Resident-on-Resident Assault

    An elderly, mobile, female nursing home patient was assaulted at the facility by another resident. The patient, who was in her room at the time of the assault and injury, was able to ambulate with a walker before the fall. The resident was pushed to the floor during the assault, where she was later found by nursing home staff, lying in a pool of blood caused by a laceration to her head. The victim was also complaining of severe left hip pain which was later diagnosed as a severe left hip fracture.

    Left Hip Fracture With Surgical FixationThe nursing home at which the assault occurred knew that the resident responsible for the assault was dangerous. In the year before the assault, he was documented in the nursing home’s records to have been involved in repeated aggressive, violent episodes of both actual and threatened harm to other residents, guests, and nursing home staff. Specifically, the resident was documented to have punched another resident in the nose, was noted to be “aggressive” with staff, and would frequently wander into other resident’s rooms. When staff attempted to re-direct the resident, he became angry. In addition to punching another resident in the nose, he was also noted by nursing home staff to have sexually assaulted another female nursing home resident and to have pushed other male residents.

    On the date of the injury to the female victim of the assault, the aggressive resident went into the female patient’s room and pushed her. A nurse heard the female patient “screaming and yelling for help” and found her “on the floor in a puddle of blood coming from her head” with the aggressive resident standing nearby. The female victim told the nurse the aggressive male resident had pushed her. While waiting for an ambulance to arrive, the female patient “kept thrashing around saying she broke her leg.”

    When rescue squad personnel arrived, they documented the female resident complaining of severe back, left hip, and head pain and had a “notable deformity” of her left hip. They also documented “noticeable blood loss” on the floor from the female patient’s head laceration.

    As a result of the fall, the female patient sustained a comminuted crush fracture of the left hip, which required surgery. The female patient also required staples for her head laceration, as well as powerful narcotics for pain control. The female patient likewise sustained significant loss of function as a result of the fall, fracture, and surgery. Her family discharged her to a separate facility, where she continued to live until her death several years later from causes unrelated to the fall. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential, generous six-figure amount.


    Left Hip Fracture with Surgical Fixation
  • Roanoke Nursing Home Patient Develops Pressure Sore Requiring Amputation; Facility Settles

    A Roanoke nursing home permitted its elderly female patient to develop pressure ulcers (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) on her right heel and right foot. When the pressure ulcers (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) were first documented, they were described to involve eschar (dead tissue). The pressure ulcers (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) were thereafter permitted to deteriorate because the facility failed to take timely pressure ulcer prevention measures. Within two months of the date on which the pressure ulcers (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) were first noted, the patient required a below-the-knee amputation of the right leg. The nursing home also permitted the patient to develop pressure ulcers (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer) on her lower back and hips. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to take timely and proper pressure ulcer prevention measures. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount in the mid-six figures.

  • Lynchburg Nursing Home Permits Patient to Develop Pressure Ulcer; Nursing Home Settles

    A Lynchburg, Virginia nursing home permitted its elderly female patient to fall and sustain a skin tear to her right leg. The skin tear deteriorated into a severe pressure ulcer (bed sore, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer). Within two months after the skin tear, the wound was observed to be necrotic with yellow slough. The wound bed was noted to have eschar,Right Leg Pressure Ulcer and the wound was extremely painful. One month later, the tendons in the patient’s leg were visible through the ulcer. The nursing home failed to send the patient to a wound center for evaluation and treatment. Two weeks later, a mere three months after the fall and skin tear, the patient’s wound was documented to be a stage IV ulcer with erosion of skin, muscle, and flesh down to the tendons of the patient’s leg. Based on the size and depth of the ulcer, the patient required an above-the-knee amputation. The patient died six months after the fall. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to take timely pressure ulcer prevention measures. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount in the mid-six figures.

  • Nursing Home Allows Patient to Fall and Sustain Hip Fracture; Nursing Home Settles

    An elderly patient at high risk for falls was permitted to sustain four falls within four months at the nursing home. As a result of the first of these four falls, the patient sustained a fracture of the right ninth rib. As a result of the third of the four falls, the patient struck his head and sustained a facial laceration that required stitches. As a result of the fourth of the four falls, the patient sustained a left hip fracture, which required open reduction and internal fixation surgery. The patient later died due to an unrelated illness. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to provide proper fall prevention, which permitted the patient’s repeated falls. The nursing home settled the case confidentially for an amount in the mid-six figures.

  • Nursing Home Permits Patient to Fall and Sustain Hip Fracture; Nursing Home Settles

    An elderly nursing home patient was admitted to a nursing home as a high fall risk. The patient was initially provided with a bed alarm, but the bed alarm was withdrawn by the nursing home shortly after the patient arrived at the facility without any notice to the patient’s family. The patient’s family noticed during a later visit, the patient did not have either a fall alarm in his wheelchair or in his bed. That patient’s family advised the nursing home the patient needed a fall alarm at all times in bed and chair. The nursing home assured the patient’s family a fall alarm would be provided.

    The next day, after the visit by the patient’s family at which the nursing home advised a fall alarm would be provided immediately, the patient fell in his room. The patient had not been provided with a fall alarm. After the fall, the patient complained of severe pain in his hip. X-rays and an MRI were obtained and revealed the patient sustained a hip fracture as a result of the fall. The patient developed breathing difficulties, an increased temperature, and pneumonia. His condition deteriorated and he died at the hospital seven days after the fall. The patient’s family sued the nursing home for failing to take proper fall prevention measures, including its failure to provide the patient with fall alarms in his bed and chair. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount.

  • Nursing Home Patient Without Alarm, Falls and Sustains Hip Fracture; Nursing Home Settles

    Right Hip Fracture with Surgical FixationAn elderly nursing home patient, known by the facility to be at high risk for falls, fell three times within a seven-hour period just days after admission to the nursing home. As a result of the third of the three falls, which occurred when the patient was left unsupervised in his wheelchair without a chair fall alarm, the patient sustained a displaced left hip fracture. The hip fracture required open reduction internal fixation surgery. The patient remained hospitalized following surgery and was later admitted to a different nursing home for skilled care. At the new nursing home, the patient became lethargic and unresponsive.

    A little over one month after the fall, the patient was transferred back to the hospital, where he was observed to have an altered mental status, was diagnosed with sepsis, and died. The patient’s family sued the nursing home at which the fall and hip fracture occurred for failing to take proper fall prevention measures. The nursing home settled the case for a confidential amount.


    Right Hip Fracture with Surgical Fixation-Nursing Home Neglect Injury
  • Nursing Home Fails to Provide Patient with Respiratory Support; Trial Verdict for Family

    A 76-year-old female nursing home patient was transferred to Berkshire Health & Rehabilitation Center, a nursing home in Vinton, Virginia operated by Medical Facilities of America, Inc. The patient had severe respiratory disease on admission.

    Oxygen Saturation LevelsThe nursing home permitted the patient’s oxygen saturation to dip to 63%. The patient complained of not being able to breath, but the nursing home’s staff did not contact a medical doctor. Her oxygen saturation remained low at approximately 62%, but no medical doctor was contacted in response. The nursing home was instructed to send the patient to the emergency department if her oxygen saturation could not be maintained at 85% or higher.

    Later in the evening after the order was received, the patient experienced breathing problems. While on the telephone with her granddaughter, she began yelling for a nurse to help her. The nursing home staff told family the patient was fine. When family visited later in the evening, they found the patient lying in her own urine and feces. Her oxygen and breathing machine also were not turned on and she was still having trouble breathing. The patient told her daughter that no nurse had responded to her repeated requests for help.

    A nursing home therapist noted that moments before the family arrived, the patient was cold, clammy, and gasping for breath, and had an oxygen saturation of 86%. The therapist alerted nurses about the patient’s condition, but the nursing home did not contact a physician.

    After the family’s visit, the patient was reported to be unresponsive. The nursing home’s staff merely pronounced the patient dead without performing CPR even though the patient was a “full code” patient who specifically wanted CPR to be performed if resuscitation became necessary.

    The patient was not revived. The patient’s family sued the nursing home and its corporate owner for failing to provide respiratory support as required and for failing to perform CPR. After a several-day trial in Roanoke, Virginia, a jury reached a verdict for the patient’s family and awarded the family a substantial sum.

     


    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.

    Brown Oxygen Saturation Monitoring Oxygen Saturation Levels
  • Patient Develops Severe Pressure Ulcers; Hospital and Nursing Home Settle

    An elderly female patient was admitted to a hospital for surgery following a hip fracture at home. On admission, the patient’s skin was intact and she had no pressure ulcers (also called pressure sores, bed sores, or decubitus ulcers). The patient was discharged from the hospital approximately one week later. At the time of discharge, the patient was documented to have three small open areas on her right buttock near the lower back. The patient was discharged from the hospital to a nursing home, which documented the patient to have open “excoriation” on her lower back. The nursing home otherwise assessed the patient as a “low risk for pressure ulcer development.”

    Hip Pressure UlcerTwo days after the patient was admitted to the nursing home, the facility noted the presence of a stage II sacral wound with dimensions of 6 cm x 6 cm with red tissue and drainage. The sacral pressure ulcer deteriorated thereafter. Within a couple of weeks, the ulcer was documented as stage IV with dimensions of 10 cm x 10 cm with significant undermining. While at the nursing home, the patient’s wound continued to deteriorate and became purulent with foul-spelling drainage and tunneling. The pressure ulcer was the source of significant pain and prevented the patient from participating in therapy following the hip fracture for which she was originally hospitalized.

    The patient was later transferred from the nursing home back to the hospital because the pressure ulcer had become infected. The patient had also developed a new pressure ulcer on her left hip. At the hospital, infection of the pressure ulcer was noted to have extended into the left hip hardware. The patient required multiple surgical debridements for the sacral and left hip pressure ulcers. She also experienced what was described in her medical records as “unbearable” pain in her buttock as a result of the sacral ulcer. The patient also required a wound vac and antibiotics. The patient was discharged from the hospital to a new nursing home, where her antibiotic therapy and wound care continued, she received therapy services, and where she remains today.

    We claimed that the hospital and nursing home failed to provide proper pressure ulcer prevention and care. Specifically, the hospital and nursing home failed to turn and reposition the patient as often as was necessary, often left the patient positioned on existing pressure ulcers, and failed to apply and use properly the wound vac, all of which caused the pressure ulcers to develop and deteriorate.

    The hospital and nursing home settled well before trial for a combined settlement in the mid-to-high six figures.



    Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia. Sacral Pressure Ulcer Left Hip Pressure Ulcer Sacral Pressure Ulcer Left Hip Pressure Ulcer Hip Pressure Ulcer

 

PLEASE NOTE: THE RESULTS OBTAINED IN SPECIFIC CASES DEPEND ON A VARIETY OF FACTORS UNIQUE TO EACH CASE.  PAST CASE RESULTS DO NOT GUARANTEE OR PREDICT A SIMILAR RESULT IN FUTURE CASES.  THE RESULTS DESCRIBED IN THIS WEBSITE ARE FROM VIRGINIA CASES HANDLED DIRECTLY BY OUR OFFICE.