Professional Group Shares Top Advice for Assisted Living Facility Placement

The National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (NAPGCM) released the results of a survey that offers critical advice to protect the growing number of seniors living in assisting living facilities.

“Too often families don’t have the information they need to protect their loved ones residing in assisted living facilities,” said Jullie Gray, NAPGCM President.

There are at least 735,000 residents in U.S. assisted living facilities. The NAPGCM explains that the typical resident is a woman about 87 years-old who is mobile, but needs assistance with approximately two to three activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing and toileting.

The top tips from the survey of professional geriatric care managers across the country conducted by the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (NAPGCM)are:

1. Before choosing a facility, check with state or local licensing agencies and the local long-term care ombudsman to ask if the facility has had safety or quality problems or complaints. If there have been problems ask what they were, when they occurred and how they were resolved.

2. Visit your loved one often. If you live out of town, or are unable to visit, ask other family members and friends to visit.

3. When you visit, eat the food, observe the residents and their interactions with staff, and talk to other families who visit their loved ones. The more you are involved and know the residents and staff the more you will be able to identify and address concerns.

4. If your loved one has dementia, learn how the facility assures their safety, including how they protect residents who are inclined to wander and if staff has appropriate training to respond to this and other behaviors associated with dementia.

5. If your loved one begins to need more care than the facility provides, obtain an independent professional assessment to determine if the facility is still appropriate for them. Many assisted living facilities do not provide one on one care. A loved one needing individualized care may need additional help hired independently, to be moved to a facility with more care, such as a nursing home, or may need hospice to be initiated.

6. If your loved one reports, or if you observe, issues with care, take action immediately. Do not wait. If the problem is serious and is not addressed promptly, help or seek help in moving your loved one to another facility. Expect to make additional visits or hire a caregiver during the transition.

7. A professional geriatric care manager can be your “eyes and ears” as an advocate and a partner in assuring quality care for your loved one in the facility.

For more, read the story.

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Robert W. Carter, Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.




 

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